Looking at getting Solar Power in 2011

Part of a solar arrayWe have been looking into getting solar power to reduce our carbon footprint here in our suburban home. We have a West/East facing roof and we expect to extend our house in maybe three or four years and gain some North facing roof, so we’d been leaving solar panels on the back burner thinking we’d worry about them then.

But. At the moment where we live in Australia there is a very good feed-in tariff, set for 20 years from the time you sign up, and also a good (federally provided) subsidy for installation. And both of those things are set to go down this July. The feed-in tariff has already been reduced once, and is set to do so every year for the next few years.

So we’ve been considering whether it would be more cost effective to buy now, even if only a small set up, and get hooked into the grid, and then add more later when we have a North facing roof. There are brackets you can use to lift up the panels on the West facing roof, to get better efficiencies. Of course, that costs more and also takes more space, since you need to have them further apart to ensure one panel is shadowing the next one. However, to be locked into a better feed-in tariff rate for the next 20 years, not to mention having and extra three or four years of solar power, it’s probably worth it from a cost perspective.

At the moment the federal subsidy works about to be about $6200 in Canberra for a 1.5 kw system or bigger (how much it is depends on where you live, as it is based on the energy produced by your system). Also this year the ACT conservation council has organised a discount for people booking through them with a particular installer – how much depends on your system size, but it’s $150 for a 1.5 kw system. Not a huge amount when you are talking several thousand dollars, but better than nothing. Maybe it will cover the cost of one of those brackets. So for the minimum sized system we’d be paying less than $4000, plus whatever extra it costs to install with the brackets.

To get a slightly bigger system the price goes up significantly, since $6200 is the maximum subsidy. But then I have a friend who is getting a solar system installed who has managed to swing an interest free loan (through the installer I think) to be paid back over three years. By her calculations the system will have completely paid for itself in five years, so basically she’ll have a small extra expense for the next three years and then it’s all roses from there. It’s looking rather attractive really.

Of course, the cost of residential solar power systems keeps going down – which is the justification for the government reducing their subsidies – so maybe the cost difference won’t be that great whether we do it now or later. But in that case, why not get the extra few years of green energy? We’ll be calling to get some quotes this week.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...